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Iowa Caucuses

I have great pride in my home state, and I think I missed Iowa more today than any day since I left. It happens only once every four years, but today all the national media focuses on the Iowa and its caucuses. Caucuses have to be one of the most fun political processes out there - a bunch of people gather in a gym, listen to a few speeches and discussions, then the "voting" begins. "Okay, everybody for John Kerry in this corner! Dean supporters to this corner! Edwards supporters over here!" And it continues on down the line. "Hey, you five people back there for Sharpton - your group's too small...either join a bigger group or drop out! Same with you Lieberman folks!" What a great process...I wish I could have been there.

My thoughts:
John Kerry - Great comeback and great win. Even if people don't know your policy, your war record and what it says about you is undeniable.
John Edwards - The trial lawyer turns out to be the nicest, cleanest campaigner in the group. Who'd a thunk it?
Howard Dean - Too much hype too early? I thought the Harkin endorsement would have put you over the top. Nobody's counting you out yet, and maybe being the underdog for a little while will be something you can use to your advantage. Unfortunately, that post-caucus speech I just saw you give was like watching a bus crash in slow motion.
Richard Gephardt - Like somebody has said...running for president isn't the hard part, it's knowing when to stop running for president. I guess a lot of Iowans just didn't care as much about NAFTA as you do. Bow out now while you can.
Dennis Kucinich - Congrats on getting 1% of the vote. I think you beat the spread. Stick in the race a little while longer - you're like Ross Perot without the Texas charm.
Al Sharpton - 0%. Too bad we don't elect presidents based solely on their entertainment value. You'd be the first president who was more fun in real life than anything SNL could put into a skit.
Everybody Else - Nobody else is talking about you right now, so I'm not going to either.

On to New Hampshire. LIVE FREE OR DIE!

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