Skip to main content

Fairplay Factor

People tend to be curious about day-to-day weather at 10,000 feet. Not too many people live up here, and I was a little curious myself about the winters in South Park. I'm happy to report that the weather is generally cold, windy, sunny, and we don't get as much snow as you'd think. See, people usually think we get a ton of snow, but a lot of it stays on the Breckenridge side of the pass. It's definitely not the defining feature of winter in Fairplay. That prize belongs to the wind.

My apartment sits on top of a hill overlooking the Platte River, and the wind howls straight down from Hoosier Pass at speeds that shake the building. It's intense. Here's where the mathematician/scientist in me gets to wondering. How does the daily peak wind gust compare to the daily peak temperature? Many days I think the wind gust is by far the higher number, and a comparison of the two measures could be used to determine the truly lousy weather days we sometimes have.

I'd call this comparison the "Fairplay Factor" and it would be a simple ratio of (peak wind speed)/(peak temperature) for each day. When the peak wind speed is greater than the high temperature for the day, the Fairplay Factor would be greater than one, and on really rough days I'm sure the Factor would exceed two often and three occasionally. (Sixty mph winds with a high temperature of 20 degrees is not a stretch up here.) A Fairplay Factor below one would be relatively decent, even if it were 10 degrees with a 5 mph wind.

All of my crazy ideas aside, sometimes the weather is just magic in the mountains, like yesterday when I was snowshoeing on 4 feet of snow in 40+ degree temperatures. That's more of a "Bliss Factor" if you ask me.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Last.fm and Ten Years of Web 2.0

Ten years ago yesterday I scrobbled my first tracks to last.fm. What's scrobbling? On last.fm, scrobbling refers to automatic music track logging to the internet. For me, uploading a record of my music listening habits was my first real experience with "Web 2.0." Remember Web 2.0? It referred to websites of user-generated content that enabled virtual communities and interoperability. Now such sites are too ubiquitous on the web to warrant a special designation — they're just the web. But that wasn't true in 2006, and even though I'd been putting content on the internet since 1996, at the time it was enough to make me a little nervous. What did these strangers want with my data, and what was in it for me?

Ten years and 24,941 scrobbles later, I have my answer: I have a really cool record of all the music I've listened to the past 10 years! Well, not "all," technically: I've certainly listened to music in places and on devices that didn't …

The 15-Year Blogoversary

15 years and 1,213 posts! My first experience with the World Wide Web came in 1995, and by 1997 I had my own web page. The first web authoring tool I remember using was Composer, an HTML editor built into the Netscape Communicator suite. That helped me learn some HTML, and later I used Microsoft Word 97 and then FrontPage 98 and later Macromedia Dreamweaver to design more elaborate pages. Some of my FrontPage-built sites are still on the web. As I learned more about HTML standards and validation I wrote more HTML by hand, but I still wanted a way to make publishing to the web easier.

By 2001 I understood that (a) sites should be updated regularly and (b) FTP'ing sites and pages from my desktop to a server was a bit of a pain. I had heard about some early blogging platforms and chose one, Blogger, to try out. As you can see, I'm still here.
My first post using Blogger came on December 8, 2001. A few months later I paid for Blogger Pro, which offered additional authoring tools, l…
If you find this page, congratulations. It's not exactly public yet. I've been maintaining a website at www.scholars.uni.edu/~johnson for several years, but my time at the university is coming to an end and I've established downclimb.com as a more permanent home on the web. I'm not yet sure how I want to juggle all the content of the site, but with this page I've decided to give Blogger a try. It provides a convenient, web-based interface for updating web logs, or "blogs". I don't have a lot of time at the moment to give this site the polish it needs, but I figure I'll give this a try and see if I like it. If not, I can always go back to the old-fashioned ways that have served me thus far. Let's hope Blogger doesn't go broke...