Skip to main content

Mt. Sheridan (and home in time for the Cubs game)

Okay, time for a real climb! Mt. Sheridan, Sherman, and Gemini sit right out my front window, so it seemed natural to head up one of them. Having climbed Sherman before, I chose Sheridan. I knew the way up there and reports of conditions on Sherman were good. Sunday I left town about 5:40 am and hit the trail at 6:25, stopping only briefly to take pictures of the weirdest (and only) 3-legged elk I'd ever seen.

The first part of the climb follows the old mining road and I turned off the road near a small mine ruin south of the Hilltop Mine. There were a number of people already headed across a large snowfield towards Sherman's south ridge. I postholed across a 25-foot stretch of snow and then scrambled up some scree until I met a faint trail headed south across Sheridan's face. Ahead of me I could see the top of Horseshoe. At a small rock shelter I headed up the scree to the summit. Both ridges (south and north) had soft snow and the rock between wasn't very stable, but it didn't last long (maybe 500 vertical feet).



I reached the summit at 8:45 and stayed until about 9:30. There was not a single other person around, so I took the time to eat, take pictures, and put on my shell (tops and bottoms) for the glissade down. Glissading was not good. The snow was too soft and the angle meant you headed towards the rocks instead of down the middle of the snow. If I had climbed down to the Sheridan-Sherman summit I probably could have found a nice, straight shot, but parts of the saddle were still corniced and I wasn't wanting to get too adventurous up there by myself.



Getting down was a piece of cake and I was soon back on the road. I met a guy coming off of Sherman and he estimated there might have been 30 people and 20 dogs on its summit. Good for them! I enjoyed my solitude. I got back to the car at about 10:45 and was home in time to shower and catch the Cubs game at noon. That's about perfect for me on any Sunday.

View Photos: Gallery Album | Google Earth

Download Data: Track in Google Earth | GPX File

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The 15-Year Blogoversary

15 years and 1,213 posts! My first experience with the World Wide Web came in 1995, and by 1997 I had my own web page. The first web authoring tool I remember using was Composer, an HTML editor built into the Netscape Communicator suite. That helped me learn some HTML, and later I used Microsoft Word 97 and then FrontPage 98 and later Macromedia Dreamweaver to design more elaborate pages. Some of my FrontPage-built sites are still on the web. As I learned more about HTML standards and validation I wrote more HTML by hand, but I still wanted a way to make publishing to the web easier.

By 2001 I understood that (a) sites should be updated regularly and (b) FTP'ing sites and pages from my desktop to a server was a bit of a pain. I had heard about some early blogging platforms and chose one, Blogger, to try out. As you can see, I'm still here.
My first post using Blogger came on December 8, 2001. A few months later I paid for Blogger Pro, which offered additional authoring tools, l…

Last.fm and Ten Years of Web 2.0

Ten years ago yesterday I scrobbled my first tracks to last.fm. What's scrobbling? On last.fm, scrobbling refers to automatic music track logging to the internet. For me, uploading a record of my music listening habits was my first real experience with "Web 2.0." Remember Web 2.0? It referred to websites of user-generated content that enabled virtual communities and interoperability. Now such sites are too ubiquitous on the web to warrant a special designation — they're just the web. But that wasn't true in 2006, and even though I'd been putting content on the internet since 1996, at the time it was enough to make me a little nervous. What did these strangers want with my data, and what was in it for me?

Ten years and 24,941 scrobbles later, I have my answer: I have a really cool record of all the music I've listened to the past 10 years! Well, not "all," technically: I've certainly listened to music in places and on devices that didn't …
If you find this page, congratulations. It's not exactly public yet. I've been maintaining a website at www.scholars.uni.edu/~johnson for several years, but my time at the university is coming to an end and I've established downclimb.com as a more permanent home on the web. I'm not yet sure how I want to juggle all the content of the site, but with this page I've decided to give Blogger a try. It provides a convenient, web-based interface for updating web logs, or "blogs". I don't have a lot of time at the moment to give this site the polish it needs, but I figure I'll give this a try and see if I like it. If not, I can always go back to the old-fashioned ways that have served me thus far. Let's hope Blogger doesn't go broke...